Teaming up for the Tuolumne

Join Tuolumne River Trust as they “Team up for the Tuolumne,” their 4th Annual Modesto Urban River Clean-Up on Saturday, September 29th from 9 am to noon. New this year— free e-waste collection at Legion Park—and a second river site in West Modesto.

Choose your site:

Legion Park (Meet at 1600 Legion Park Drive)
Open to all ages!
Join us by canoe or foot.
Bring your water bottle and sunscreen.
Click here to register
For more information email karlha@tuolumne.org


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West Modesto (Meet at the John Thurman Field parking lot-601 Neece Drive)
Open for ages 8 and up.
Join us as we walk to the rivers edge.
Bring your water bottle and sunscreen
Click here to register
For more information email analisa@tuolumne.org


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Leave No Trace Awareness Workshop

Columbia College - Sonora, Ca

Event type:
Awareness Workshops

Date:
Wednesday, September 26, 2012 - 11:00am to Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 1:00pm

Event Street Address:
11600 Columbia College Drive
Sonora
California
95370

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Description:
The Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers will be visiting Columbia College to work with the Forestry and Natural Resources Majors on both Wednesday and Thursday.

Host Contact Name:
Tom Hofstra

Host Email:
Tom Hofstra

Check out the event page; http://lnt.org/events/columbia-college-sonora-ca

Elephant Nature Park volunteer journal for April 6th by Albert Iggi

During the night there was a thunderstorm, the sound of what surely was a hog being eaten by a Tiger and of course, the roosters and the animals calling to be fed at dawn. In the morning, we discovered the sounds during the night came from a hog giving birth. The Piglets were suckling on the exhausted sow lying next to the still wet placenta. 

One of the hogs gave birth during the night

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Elephant Nature Park volunteer journal for April 5th by Albert Iggi

On Thursday we stayed in the Karen hill tribe village. We were lucky to have the school aged children home that week for a Thai holiday. The village does not have a school, so the older children usually live in another village to attend school.

The morning in the village was busy as usual. The women were doing chores like processing rice below the houses using the ancient method of pounding the kernels to remove the husks and separating the rice from the husks with large, round, wicker baskets. We taught the kids English and they tried to teach us the Karen language. The kids fared better than the volunteers. With our guides Pada and Chay as interpreters, we entered a couple of the houses and hung out with the owners. 
 
The latrine & bucket shower 

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Elephant Nature Park volunteer journal 4-April by Albert Iggi

The inner walls in our new host family’s house were woven grass panels. I fell asleep listening to the husband and wife talking and laughing. They had a good relationship. Their 4 kids seemed happy. The 11 year old girl, Owan, became my favorite kid in the village. Each day her work started before dawn and ended when she washed the woks and dishes after our dinner. One grandmother was healthy. The other old lady in the house was frail and she hacked throughout the night.


The family had water buffalo, hogs, goats, chickens and dogs. The ribs on the animals did not show as much as those on the animals in the first village. Overall, this village seemed to thrive more than the first village. The father in our house and other men in the village were mahout for the elephant in the local herd. Perhaps the payments to the village from Elephant Nature Park (ENP) for the Mahout and hosting the volunteers made the difference between a thriving village and one that just scrimps by.

Host family house and animals  

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Elephant Nature Park (ENP) volunteer field notes 3-April by Albert Iggi

We woke before dawn in our host family’s house to the sound of noisy farm animals. The plan that day was to walk all day to the next host village with Pugee (poo-geee), an adult male Asian Elephant.

I asked our guides Pada and Chay (Chai) if I could help make breakfast. I needed to be Italian, even while volunteering in a Karen hill tribe village in Northern Thailand. It was a smart move. The two young boys in the family warmed up to me while I chopped vegetables on the floor in the family’s kitchen space. It was a good vantage point for pictures of the boys and the women from the village while they sold traditional Karen tribe cloth and handbags to the volunteers. The guides also cooked rice noodles with vegetables for our lunch and wrapped individual portions in banana leaves tied with string.  

 
Pada cooking breakfast & lunch to-go 

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